A Mini Guide To Stuttgart

Culture lovers, automotive enthusiasts, couples on romantic getaways or young families alike will all find something to enjoy in the beautiful city of Stuttgart.

Despite being the sixth largest city in Germany, Stuttgart is remarkably lush and green set in sprawling hills and valleys with an abundance of landscaped parks and gardens, not to mention the natural springs that the area is renowned for making it a very popular destination for tourists.

Stuttgart is a city with a small town feel that packs everything from architectural engineering and historic culture to vibrant markets, festivals and fashionable designer label shopping into its characteristic streets.

Places of interest:

Sadly there are few historic buildings remaining in Germany after World War II, however there are some rare examples to be found in Stuttgart and these, amongst others, are worth a visit:

Staatstheater (The State Theatre) 1912

Altes Schloss (Old Palace) 1300-1500

Neues Schloss (New Palace) 1700-1800

Wilhelmspalais (King Williams Palace) 1834-1840

Hauptbanholf (Main Railway Station) 1920

There are many museums to visit in Stuttgart, namely the State Gallery and the Natural History Museum, but for motoring enthusiasts the Mercedes-Benz and Porsche technology museums are a must! The Carl Zeiss Planetarium will take you on an inspiring journey through our solar system or why not try the Wilhelma Zoological and Botanical gardens, complete with a 19th century palace at its centre. If you are looking to relax and unwind be sure to visit one of the many natural mineral springs in Stuttgart to bathe or enjoy a sauna.

Shopping:

The main shopping street in Stuttgart is the Königstraße, which starts at the main railway station, and most shops are open until 8pm but close on Sundays. The currency is euros and all prices on German price tags include tax. For visitors from outside the EU, a Value Added Tax (VAT) form can be bought for €3 each which entitles shoppers to 19% off the listed price. It is worth noting that public restrooms are usually not free to enter and will cost you around €0.50.

Parks and Gardens:

There are many beautiful parks and gardens that surround the city centre in a U-shape; hence they are referred to by the locals as “das Grüne U” (the green “U”). These meticulously landscaped areas form a long and beautiful path around the city, starting at the Neues Schloss (New Palace) and ending in Killesberg Park.  A leisurely walk along this path takes around 3 hours, however with so many restaurants and cafes along the way, not to mention the stunning architecture of the Killesberg Tower, it is worth making a day of it.

Culture & Entertainment:

Stuttgart is proud of its skilled ballet company who perform to a very high standard, so a visit to the Ballet Company of the State Theatre is recommended, although you will need to reserve tickets in advance.

Stuttgart hosts many events including the world’s second largest fun fair, Volksfest, late September-early October. This fun fair is free to enter making it very popular with families during the day. Also a trip to Germany in December would not be complete without visiting a Christmas market, and Weihnachtsmarkt in Stuttgart has hundreds of stalls selling traditional German food and trinkets, ideal for unique gifts.

Stuttgart as a holiday destination, or even just as a stop off for those visiting Germany, it is sure not to disappoint.